responding to a paragraph Reflections

these are 2 paragraphs reflections i need please a respond for each one so each respond must be 180 words

The First one :

I like the description of chapter 8 that is about the history of different countries including Mexican and African American. This chapter also includes the race and bilingual problem. From the beginning of the historic, the United States is the country of many languages. English is the dominant language in the United States and also English is an international language. The first constitution in the California was published for the English and Spanish because it was considered that California was the part of the Mexico and the inhabitant was most of the Hispanics and Latinos. At that time Spanish is considered as the foreign.

Moreover, in the New Mexico, the Spanish was also the ‘foreign’. Most of the Mexicans was attempted the injustice by using phrase “this our homeland”. At that time injustice was increasing. The white supremacist was used the Mexicans this can lead the disregard on the part of the history. The main argument with the Mexican labeled with the foreign was obtained with the Native Americans. Native Americans should have involved in the issue of the language. The United States had provided the translators and documentation for all the languages. At that time many people are discriminated because of their language.

The Second one :

This chapter and the history it gives is near and dear to my heart, as I am Mexican and my family migrated from Mexico. There are two things that stood out to me in this chapter: the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) and the early & contemporary stereotypes of Mexican immigrants.

The IRCA legalized undocumented individuals who resided in the U.S. since 1982; provided sanctions to employers who hired undocumented individuals; provided reimbursements for the cost of legalization; allowed screening of migrants who applied for welfare; and authorized programs to “bring in agriculture laborers” (Feagin 213). Through IRCA, my family was one of the 1.7 million who were accepted for legalization and became legal residents of the U.S., and we eventually all became citizens.

The early and contemporary stereotypes of Mexican immigrants – and Mexican Americans – seem to be similar. Specifically the idea that Mexicans only cross the border to obtain government help, when in actuality, “Latinos, including immigrants, have higher labor force participation rates than non-Latinos” (Feagin 214). My father was a dairy-man for 30 plus years and my mother a professional Mexican culinary cook for many years until a sever stroke impaired her. Throughout those years, my parents raised eleven (yes, you read correctly … ELEVEN) children without any government help. Some may call it pride, but my parents refused to seek or accept help from the government, or anyone else for that matter. I recall my mother going to downtown L.A. 1-2 times a year to purchase remnant fabric by the pallet so she could make clothes for all us kids. And we never went without food; even if all we had were beans and rice to eat, we didn’t go hungry. So, it’s strikes a nerve in me that some people still have the mindset that immigrants only come to this country to be supported by the government!